Summer reading

Hey there,

Hope your day is going well so far.

I read a Book Riot post recently about creating your own summer reading syllabus. I usually have a rough idea which books I want to read next but recently, because I’ve been setting up the business, reading regrettably has taken a bit of a back seat. When I read the post, it reminded me that I would probably benefit from a bit of forward planning. And taking the whole summer as the timeframe allows for flexibility around everything else that’s going on.

As for many of us, there are a TON of books in my TBR pile, mainly fiction. The Book Riot post reminded me to think about the non-fiction books that I’ve been meaning to read, so I decided to build them into my list. This is what I’ve come up with:

Non- Fiction

Digital Photography for Dummies – Julie Adair King

I’ve had this book for a couple of years and have dipped in and out, but I’d like to make a concerted effort to understand my camera better. I’d like to be able to do my own product photos and generally keep a better pictorial record of our family life.

Mindfulness – Mark Williams and Danny Penman

Although practicing Mindfulness has been very popular for years now, it’s not something I’ve looked into before. When I wanted to find out more about it, my first reaction (obviously) was to buy a book. This too has been sitting on the shelf for a bit, so it’s on the list!

Mindfulness

A field guide to Fabric Design – Kim Kight

In the not too distant future, I would like to incorporate textiles into the business in addition to the stationery. Anything I can read to improve my skills in this area and I’m in!

Yes, please – Amy Poehler

I bought this after watching Parks and Recreation on Amazon Prime. The reason I haven’t read it yet is I feel the text is so blimmin’ small! If there’s one thing that will get my goat about a book, it’s when I find the text uncomfortably small to read. I’ll see how I get on, but I think it might be a struggle.

Fiction

The Little Flower Shop by the Sea – Ali McNamara

I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned before on the blog, but one career I’ve thought about pursuing a few times in my life is floristry. Any books about flower shops, therefore, are likely to be up my street, so I’m looking forward to reading this.

Us – David Nicholls

Like the rest of the world, I really enjoyed One Day so I have high hopes for Us. I know I’m very late to the party with this one, but hey ho.

What are your summer reading plans? I’d love to know, so please get in touch either here or on Twitter!

Enjoy the rest of your day.

Elle. 🙂 xx

TAPESTRY_front150dpi copy Amazon and websitesIn hope, in pain,

we lose, we gain,

but always and forever

the human heart braves life

in light and in shade.

Tapestry. A collection of twelve short stories exploring the complexities of life and love. Available now.

 

Who do you auto-buy?

Hey there,

Hope your day is going well so far.

This statement won’t come as a surprise to you – I buy a lot of books 🙂 .  Since I’m starting my own business and expect not to have an income for a while, I’m trying to rein it in a bit, but there are some people whose books I definitely don’t want to miss out on. I thought I’d let you know who I auto-buy when they bring out a new title. Although I do read the blurbs of their books, I wouldn’t need to before it goes in either my real or virtual basket.

The list below is in no particular order. I’m deliberately leaving out the writer buddies whom I feel I know. They are definitely among my favourites, but they know that already. 🙂

So here we go:

Jojo Moyes

I think the first Jojo Moyes book I read was The Last Letter from Your Lover which I enjoyed, but it was Me Before You that put her on my auto-buy list. I’m sure this is the same for a lot of people. I haven’t yet made my way through her backlist, but I will.

Miranda Dickenson

I read Miranda’s It Started with a Kiss first and then immediately picked up her first two books. She’s been an auto-buy ever since because her stories are so gentle and positive. It’s impossible not to feel uplifted and, due to the normal timings of her releases, it usually means that Christmas is just round the corner.

Jenny Colgan

Again I love the gentle and feel-good nature of Jenny’s books. The first one I read was Meet Me at the Cupcake Café. I think my favourites are the Rosie Hopkins series, although who wouldn’t love their own puffin after reading about Neil in the Beach Street Bakery books?

Kate Morton

If I remember correctly I think I found out about Kate Morton because The House at Riverton was a Richard and Judy pick. I love the settings of Kate’s books and they’re quite long – really books to get immersed in.

Katherine Webb

A TV book club recommendation, I first read The Legacy. I enjoy books set in two time periods and a considerable amount of secret uncovering never hurts! My favourite of Katherine’s so far is A Half Forgotten Song. It’s quite dark, about obsessive love, but it’s set in a couple of time periods with some good old secret uncovering, so what’s not to love.

Toni Jordan

It was while I was reading Addition that I decided, after many years of faffing about, that I was definitely going to write a book of my own, so it has a special place in my heart. There was nothing specific about the book itself that made me think that, I just enjoyed it and thought “I want to be able to do that.” Perhaps it was a timing thing, but it meant I immediately picked up Toni’s next book, Fall Girl, when it came out. It became, and remains, one of my favourite reads. In Fall Girl the main character, Della, is a professional con artist. I find that Toni Jordan’s storylines are a little bit different and this makes for a very entertaining read.

Emylia Hall

The Book of Summers, set in Hungary, was the first book of Emylia’s that I read. I read it not long after I’d been to Budapest, so I loved reading about a different Hungarian setting. My favourite, though, is A Heart Bent out of Shape, set in Lausanne. It’s a coming of age book about first love, growing up and the events that can shape a life.

Liane Moriarty

What I love about Liane Moriarty’s books is the way she observes and writes about ordinary lives and situations, proving that nothing is actually ordinary at all. It’s hard to pick a favourite but, if I had to go for one, it would be What Alice Forgot about a woman who hits her head and loses a decade of her life. Eep.

What do you think about this list of authors? Who do you auto-buy? Not that I need a bigger TBR pile, but I’d love to hear your recommendations!

Enjoy the rest of your day.

Elle. 🙂 xx

TAPESTRY_front150dpi copy Amazon and websitesIn hope, in pain,

we lose, we gain,

but always and forever

the human heart braves life

in light and in shade.

Tapestry. A collection of twelve short stories exploring the complexities of life and love. Available now.

Additions to my TBR pile

Hey there,

Happy Friday! It’s nearly the weeeekend! 🙂 🙂 🙂

I’ve stocked up my TBR pile! Not that it needed it, but I couldn’t resist. That happens, right? 😉

These lovely fellas are in my sights for the next few weeks:

IMG_1444

 

The Little Flower Shop by the Sea – Ali McNamara

The Best Thing I Never Had – Erin Lawless

The Great Village Show – Alexandra Brown

Us – David Nicholls

Plus on my kindle:

Please Release Me – Rhoda Baxter

After You – Jojo Moyes

A Parcel for Anna Browne – Miranda Dickinson

They should keep me out of mischief for a bit.

I’m sure your TBR pile is sky high too but, if you have room for one more *coughs and shuffles feet* can I interest you in Tapestry? Just a thought. 😉

Happy Reading!

Elle 🙂 xx

TAPESTRY_front150dpi copy Amazon and websitesIn hope, in pain,

we lose, we gain,

but always and forever

the human heart braves life

in light and in shade.

Tapestry, available 29 September 2015. To pre-order, click here. 🙂