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Hey there,

Are you playing the tune in your head? Are you? Dah dah DAH, dah dah dah dah, dah-dah-dah-dah dah dah, dah dah dah DAH.

Anyway, whether you’re singing along or whether you don’t know what the heck I’m talking about, I hope your day is going well so far. 🙂

Next week I’m self-publishing my short story collection, Tapestry. I know you know this already, but I need to keep repeating it to myself because at the moment it all still feels a bit unreal.

A couple of weeks ago I posted about how it all began up to the point where I had my stories but wanted and needed to bring in a professional editor to ensure they were up to scratch for public consumption. Read on if you want to know what happened next…

Choosing the right editor seemed a bit of a boggling activity when I first started looking on t’internet. Not all editors deal with short stories which cut down the field, but it was quite hard to determine levels of experience and ability straight off the bat. I also had to try to button down what “type” of editing I wanted. Some of the editing terms seemed to be used interchangeably, some used the same term as others, but meant very different things.

I wanted an edit of the sense and content of the stories. I wanted comment on “that doesn’t make sense” and “I don’t think the character would do that” and “that would never happen” plus a proof read because, although I am diligent and attention to detail is important to me, I find eventually I suffer from invisible comma syndrome.

What? It’s a real condition. 😉

When it came to choosing who to work with, I therefore looked for someone who did different types of editing. I also wanted someone who came recommended in some way. My search led me to John Hudspith who had previously worked with an online buddy whose views I trust. Johnny gave some very wise and wonderful advice throughout the process. He commented on everything from big picture “that wouldn’t happen like that” to swapping word order and shifting commas. He was also extremely encouraging whilst still managing to make it clear what he didn’t like. You can find out more about Johnny here.

After editing came the cover design. I only had a vague idea about the cover design process in practical terms, so I set the ball rolling to get quotes as we finished the editing process. I searched the internet but, again, I wanted someone I’d heard a bit about. I was very happy and lucky to ultimately work with Berni Stevens, a cover designer and author. I sent a brief bit about my stories to Berni along with a few of my personal preferences for book covers and she produced the beautiful cover for Tapestry that you see below. We had, I think, very little “back and forth” as I loved Berni’s suggestions from the start. As I said before, she just seemed to get what I wanted, even though I wasn’t sure myself.

I really enjoyed working with these lovely people and it has definitely made the whole process more exciting. If you’re around tomorrow, I’ll tell you more about each of the twelve stories that make up Tapestry.

In the meantime, I’d love to hear how you are getting on so please get in touch either here or on twitter.

Much love,

Elle. 🙂 xx

TAPESTRY_front150dpi copy Amazon and websites

In hope, in pain,

we lose, we gain,

but always and forever

the human heart braves life

in light and in shade.

Tapestry, available 29 September 2015. To pre-order, click here. 🙂